Oct 7 2010

Back Yard Sea Level – Your back yard

Kal @ 11:54

Click to view full size

Information is Beautiful puts some things in perspective. Sea rise due to Global Warming, for instance.

Two meters higher wipes out Los Angeles, Amsterdam, Hamburg, and St. Petersburg. Large parts of San Francisco and Manhatton are also submerged.

That is a lot of nice Real Estate that will be going to waste.

Tags:

Category: Climate Change | Beyond Petroleum | Economics | Population | Politics | Sustainability

Aug 16 2010

Full Employment – Gone forever?

Kal @ 23:05

A few days ago someone sent the following email with the subject: EMPLOYMENT MAP.....Shocking!!!

Incredible!
Wow!!!  Very sobering and enlightening.
Somebody spent a lot of time breaking this down by every county in the country.

Review this Unemployment map of the United States .
This is hard to believe! I had to review this map a couple of times to grasp the enormity of it.


Displayed this way sure brings the perspective up close and personal.
This is scary. If you have a job, be thankful!


Be certain to click the PLAY button in the middle of the map
and take note of the dates above the US map as it advances month by month
! ! !

http://cohort11.americanobserver.net/latoyaegwuekwe/multimediafinal.html

More...

Tags:

Category: Climate Change | Politics | Population | Resource Depletion | Steady-State Economics | Sustainability

Jun 30 2010

Beyond Petroleum – The disaster continues!

Kal @ 18:17

From Population Growth Must Stop by Gary Peters

As Kenneth Boulding noted decades ago, "Anyone who believes that exponential growth can go on forever in a finite world is either a madman or an economist."

Tags:

Category: Beyond Petroleum | Economics | Peak Oil | Population | Sustainability

Jun 4 2010

Beyond Petroleum – Can anyone still think more petroleum is good?

Kal @ 09:07

Petroleum related disasters everywhere. The Gulf is burning. The climate is deteriorating. Europe is broke. The US has nearly 20% unemployment. Other regions have even more. People are hungry and homeless.

Isn’t it about time to think about alternative ways to organize the distribution of goods and services? What we are doing is clearly not working.

But all I hear from officialdom is “more of the same”, possibly better, but more of the same basically.

No discussion of whether it is a jungle we live in, or a community? There is a lot of discussion of The Market, and how efficient it is. The Market looks a lot like a very complex jungle to me, where the strong win and the weak get eaten.

Tags:

Category: Beyond Petroleum | Climate Change | Peak Oil | Politics | Population | Solar | Sustainability | Steady-State Economics

Apr 16 2010

Time to end the two-wage-earner family?

Kal @ 17:36

John Michael Greer has an interesting post up about the economics of both husband and wife working for wages titled A Blindness to Systems. His  basic point is that the US could end the unemployment problem overnight just by having one of the partners in a nuclear family stop working for wages and begin working at home for the common good of the family. The Blindness to Systems aspect is that there are a lot of costs associated with that second income, but that these are often ignored in the decision process of whether or not that second partner should work for wages.

Some of the benefits to the family of one partner staying at home include better cared for children, fewer work and commute expenses,  less time wasted commuteing, better nutrition due to home cooking, possibility of a garden, and home constructed clothing, to name a few.

Some of the benefits to society would be less wasted resources, happier and healthier children, and higher average wages due to increased competition for available workers.

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Tags:

Category: Economics | Employment | Guaranteed Wage | Politics | Population | Steady-State Economics | Sustainability

Feb 17 2010

Bill Gates: the Most Important Climate Speech of the Year

Kal @ 16:09

From Alex Steffen at WorldChanging:

When We Talk Zero, We Sound Crazy. When Bill Gates Does It, Bankers Pick Up the Phone.

On Friday, the world's most successful businessperson and most powerful philanthropist did something outstandingly bold, that went almost unremarked: Bill Gates announced that his top priority is getting the world to zero climate emissions.

And Friday, Gates predicted extraordinary climate action: zero. Not small steps, not incremental progress, not doing less bad: zero. In fact, he stood in front of a slide with nothing but the planet Earth and the number zero. That moment was the most important thing that has happened at TED.

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Tags:

Category: Climate Change | Economics | Population | Resource Depletion | Steady-State Economics | Sustainability

Nov 5 2009

It is not possible to continue infinite consumption and infinite population growth on a finite planet

Kal @ 09:15

There is a new movie out, “Collapse” – staring Mike Ruppert. It got a review in The Wall Street Journal.

The Wall Street Journal: What is the central message of your movie?

Mr. Ruppert: It is not possible to continue infinite consumption and infinite population growth on a finite planet.

Duh!

Tags:

Category: Sustainability | Steady-State Economics | Resource Depletion | Recession | Population | Peak Oil | Economics | Climate Change

Oct 25 2009

Could the US could stop importing oil tomorrow?

Kal @ 20:17

According to calculations included in a piece titled America 2.0!, “Americans could be wasting something like 2 billion tonnes of oil equivalent per year!” The calculation after the jump:

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Tags:

Category: Peak Oil | Politics | Population | Resource Depletion | Steady-State Economics

Oct 12 2009

Natural Capital -- living systems and ecosystems services - what we call resources

Kal @ 12:11

Capitalism that I can believe in. From: Worldchanging Interview: Paul Hawken, WorldChanging Team, 25 Sep 09

Three years before the book came out, I had written an article called "Natural Capitalism," and coined the term. And what I was writing about was Natural Capital, and that was (coined) by E. F. Schumacher. And what he was trying to say, as an economist, was (take a) look at this form of capital -- living systems and ecosystems services, what we call resources. We don't put this on the balance sheet of the world. We count it as zero, until we cut it down, extract it, mine it, kill it. And then it has value. But before we do that, it has zero value. That's crazy. It has more value before we touch it.


So, then it goes to Herman Daly, and what Herman Daly was saying is that the limiting factor to human prosperity to the world wasn't human productivity, but the productivity of our resources because we are in a resource restrained world caused by our industrial systems taking so much, so often and for so long. Therefore, when you have an economy and you see what the limiting factors are to development, then you work on maximizing what is limiting. And what is limiting to us isn't people, we have lots of people, too many some may say.

… Basically we are using less and less of what we have more of, and with natural capital, using more and more of what we have less of. And we are using more of it (natural capital) to make people more productive, to use less people. So this is upside down and backwards, we should be using more and more people to use less and less natural capital.

Tags:

Category: Climate Change | Population | Steady-State Economics | Sustainability

Sep 23 2009

Family Values I Can Believe In

Kal @ 16:29

Those could be my words if I were more eloquent, but they came from Mike Lux at Open Left.

For my dad, it was his faith that gave him those values. To feed the hungry, to give water to the thirsty, to clothe the naked, to visit the sick and those in prison. To welcome the stranger. To be our brother's and sister's keeper. To proclaim good news to the poor and let the oppressed go free. To show mercy and love kindness. Those are the values I was raised with, and when I hear Joe Wilson from the buckle of the Bible belt scream "You lie" at this President when he is talking about health care for all, I wonder how those values got so distorted.

So, Dad, wherever you are, thank you for raising me with those values and not the bitter angry ugliness of the Glenn Becks, Rush Limbaughs, and Joe Wilsons of this world. A lot has changed since you left this good earth, but we're still fighting the ugliness. But I honor you and all those famous and unsung pioneers for human justice who have gone before us. I am thankful that there were people like you and my mom who welcomed the stranger, people who welcomed Barack Obama, Sr and so many other immigrants who have contributed to the quality of this country, and still are. The next time I write, I hope I'll be telling you that we finally have decent health care for all, and that we live in a country where immigrants are finally welcome.

Tags:

Category: Politics | Population | Immigration